Maturity-associated variation in physical activity and health-related quality of life in British adolescent girls: moderating effects of peer acceptance

Dominika M. Pindus, Sean P. Cumming, Lauren B. Sherar, Catherine Gammon, Manuel Coelho e Silva, Robert M. Malina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Using a Biocultural Model of Maturity-Associated Variance in physical activity (PA) as a conceptual framework, the main and interactive effects of biological maturity status and perceived peer acceptance on PA and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adolescent girls were examined.

Methods: Three hundred forty-two female British students in years 7 to 9 (13.2 ± 0.83 years) participated in the study. All participants completed the PA Questionnaire for Adolescents and KIDSCREEN-10, a measure of HRQoL. Self-reported perceptions of peer acceptance were measured by items from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Maturity status was estimated as the percentage of predicted adult (mature) height attained at the time of observation.

Results: Analysis of covariance suggested an influence of peer acceptance on maturity-associated differences in PA, but not on HRQoL. Girls early and “on time” in maturation with higher perceptions of peer acceptance reported greater involvement in PA than girls early and “on time” in maturation with lower perceptions of peer acceptance. A reverse association was observed for late-maturing girls.

Conclusions: Peer acceptance is an important moderator of maturity-associated variation in PA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-766
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume21
Issue number5
Early online date28 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

Keywords

  • Adolescent girls
  • Biological maturation
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Peers
  • Physical activity
  • Self-report
  • UK

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