Mapping the genetic basis of ecologically and evolutionarily relevant traits in Arabidopsis thaliana

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Abstract

There has been a long standing interest in the relationship between genetic and phenotypic variation in natural populations, in order to understand the genetic basis of adaptation and to discover natural alleles to improve crops. Here we review recent developments in mapping approaches that have significantly improved our ability to identify causal polymorphism explaining natural variation in ecological and evolutionarily relevant traits. However, challenges in interpreting these discoveries remain. In particular, we need more detailed transcriptomic, epigenomic, and gene network data to help understand the mechanisms behind identified associations. Also, more studies need to be performed under field conditions or using experimental evolution to determine whether polymorphisms identified in the lab are relevant for adaptation and improvement under natural conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)212-217
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Plant Biology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

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chromosome mapping
Arabidopsis thaliana
genetic polymorphism
transcriptomics
phenotypic variation
epigenetics
alleles
genetic variation
crops
gene regulatory networks

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Mapping the genetic basis of ecologically and evolutionarily relevant traits in Arabidopsis thaliana. / Kover, Paula X; Mott, R.

In: Current Opinion in Plant Biology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 212-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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