Manufacturing technologies and joining methods of metallic thin-walled pipes for use in high pressure cooling systems

Sophie McNair, Alborz Shokrani Chaharsooghi, Mauro Carnevale, Antti Onnela, Jerome Daugin, Kamil Cichy, Nicola Bacchetta, Hanz Postema, Alexander J G Lunt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Small diameter thin-walled pipes, typically with a diameter less than 20 mm and a ratio of outer diameter to wall thickness is 20 or above, have increasingly become a key value adding factor for a number of industries including medical applications, electronics and chemical industries. In high-energy physics experiments, thin-walled pipes are needed in tracking detector cooling systems where the mass of all components needs to be minimised for physics measurement reasons. The pipework must reliably withstand the cooling fluid operation pressures (of up to 100 bar), but must also be able to be reliably and easily joined within the cooling system. Suitable standard and/or commercial solutions combining the needed low mass and reliable high-pressure operation are poorly available. The following review of literature compares the various techniques that exist for the manufacture and joining of thin-walled pipes, both well-established techniques and novel methods which have potential to increase the use of thin-walled pipes within industrial cooling systems. Gaps in knowledge have been identified, along with further research directions. Operational challenges and key considerations which have to be identified when designing a system which uses thin-walled pipes are also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology
Early online date7 Sep 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Sep 2021

Cite this