Making Sense of Sustainability: Exploring the Subjective Meaning of Sustainable Consumption

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Abstract

This article investigated what the term “sustainability” meant to a group of proenvironmental people living in Peterborough, in the east of England. The data was collected and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analyses. Recycling came most readily to mind in those interviewed. Results revealed that respondents attributed unsustainable behavior in themselves and others to “lack of thought.” The various strands of the analysis, when drawn together into a coherent framework, highlight that the business of life continues to perpetuate thoughtless consuming, even in those who are conscious of global warming. This suggests that education programs could be orientated toward addressing this “lack of thought” to encourage more thoughtful consumption.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187
Number of pages195
JournalApplied Environmental Education and Communication
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2015

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title = "Making Sense of Sustainability: Exploring the Subjective Meaning of Sustainable Consumption",
abstract = "This article investigated what the term “sustainability” meant to a group of proenvironmental people living in Peterborough, in the east of England. The data was collected and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analyses. Recycling came most readily to mind in those interviewed. Results revealed that respondents attributed unsustainable behavior in themselves and others to “lack of thought.” The various strands of the analysis, when drawn together into a coherent framework, highlight that the business of life continues to perpetuate thoughtless consuming, even in those who are conscious of global warming. This suggests that education programs could be orientated toward addressing this “lack of thought” to encourage more thoughtful consumption.",
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