Load concentrations around crystal aggregates in articular cartilage under short term loading

S. E. Clift, A. Hayes, A. W. Miles, B. Harris, P. A. Dieppe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The deposition of crystals in joints is a feature of a number of joint diseases. Crystals are frequently observed on the surface of articular cartilage and in the mid-zone. The purpose of this investigation was to model the stress concentrations in the mid-zone of the cartilage layer arising from the presence of large crystal aggregates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the geometry and distribution of crystal aggregates within the cartilage layer. Finite element and photoelastic approaches were then used to predict the stress distribution around spherical aggregates 50 and 100 microns in diameter. The implication of the results is that very densely packed and tightly bound spherical aggregates will themselves carry a certain amount of load. However, less tightly packed aggregates, perhaps interspersed with fibrous tissue, are potentially much more damaging.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-40
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H - Journal of Engineering in Medicine
Volume207
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Crystals
Stress concentration
Tissue
Scanning electron microscopy
Geometry

Cite this

@article{fcbeaf56b9f64f55ac4b8b80521222c5,
title = "Load concentrations around crystal aggregates in articular cartilage under short term loading",
abstract = "The deposition of crystals in joints is a feature of a number of joint diseases. Crystals are frequently observed on the surface of articular cartilage and in the mid-zone. The purpose of this investigation was to model the stress concentrations in the mid-zone of the cartilage layer arising from the presence of large crystal aggregates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the geometry and distribution of crystal aggregates within the cartilage layer. Finite element and photoelastic approaches were then used to predict the stress distribution around spherical aggregates 50 and 100 microns in diameter. The implication of the results is that very densely packed and tightly bound spherical aggregates will themselves carry a certain amount of load. However, less tightly packed aggregates, perhaps interspersed with fibrous tissue, are potentially much more damaging.",
author = "Clift, {S. E.} and A. Hayes and Miles, {A. W.} and B. Harris and Dieppe, {P. A.}",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1243/PIME_PROC_1993_207_266_02",
language = "English",
volume = "207",
pages = "35--40",
journal = "Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine",
issn = "0954-4119",
publisher = "Sage Publications",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Load concentrations around crystal aggregates in articular cartilage under short term loading

AU - Clift, S. E.

AU - Hayes, A.

AU - Miles, A. W.

AU - Harris, B.

AU - Dieppe, P. A.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - The deposition of crystals in joints is a feature of a number of joint diseases. Crystals are frequently observed on the surface of articular cartilage and in the mid-zone. The purpose of this investigation was to model the stress concentrations in the mid-zone of the cartilage layer arising from the presence of large crystal aggregates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the geometry and distribution of crystal aggregates within the cartilage layer. Finite element and photoelastic approaches were then used to predict the stress distribution around spherical aggregates 50 and 100 microns in diameter. The implication of the results is that very densely packed and tightly bound spherical aggregates will themselves carry a certain amount of load. However, less tightly packed aggregates, perhaps interspersed with fibrous tissue, are potentially much more damaging.

AB - The deposition of crystals in joints is a feature of a number of joint diseases. Crystals are frequently observed on the surface of articular cartilage and in the mid-zone. The purpose of this investigation was to model the stress concentrations in the mid-zone of the cartilage layer arising from the presence of large crystal aggregates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the geometry and distribution of crystal aggregates within the cartilage layer. Finite element and photoelastic approaches were then used to predict the stress distribution around spherical aggregates 50 and 100 microns in diameter. The implication of the results is that very densely packed and tightly bound spherical aggregates will themselves carry a certain amount of load. However, less tightly packed aggregates, perhaps interspersed with fibrous tissue, are potentially much more damaging.

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/PIME_PROC_1993_207_266_02

U2 - 10.1243/PIME_PROC_1993_207_266_02

DO - 10.1243/PIME_PROC_1993_207_266_02

M3 - Article

VL - 207

SP - 35

EP - 40

JO - Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine

JF - Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine

SN - 0954-4119

IS - 1

ER -