Abstract

Ensuring that global infrastructure keeps pace with the demands of economic growth and human wellbeing is anticipated to result in spend of US$57 trillion (2013-30). Specific to the UK power sector, redesigning the electrical transmission network to support decarbonisation of the economy will result in an estimated spend in the region of US$50 billion (2010-20). The challenge within the infrastructure sector is in ensuring that investment productivity is maximized and the appropriate assets are built. One approach being used are decision support tools (DSTs) aimed at assisting the optimum asset choice, by considering a range of costs across the life of the asset. However, there is a gap in ensuring the sustainability of these tools: that is, ensuring that after adoption they continue to offer the same value. The research presented in this paper considers 'performance decay' of DSTs and proposes an approach to ensure they remain 'fit for purpose'. Our research proposes that adopting a quality management system approach will combat performance decay, and move current DSTs from 'static' to 'live' and evolving states. Within this paper a review of literature is provided. Scenarios are used to explore possible changes in performance, and an industry exemplar used to demonstrate the plausibility of performance decay. An approach to address performance decay by embedding quality management systems techniques is then introduced.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication21st Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference
Subtitle of host publication10th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems
Place of PublicationU. S. A.
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
PagesV004Y05A034
Volume4
ISBN (Electronic)9780791850145
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016
EventASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016 - Charlotte, USA United States
Duration: 21 Aug 201624 Aug 2016

Conference

ConferenceASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016
CountryUSA United States
CityCharlotte
Period21/08/1624/08/16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modelling and Simulation

Cite this

Lattanzio, S., Newnes, L., McManus, M., & Dunkley, D. (2016). Life cycle decision support tools: The use of quality management techniques in combating decision tool 'performance decay'. In 21st Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference: 10th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems (Vol. 4, pp. V004Y05A034). [DETC2016-59888] U. S. A.: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-59888

Life cycle decision support tools : The use of quality management techniques in combating decision tool 'performance decay'. / Lattanzio, Susan; Newnes, Linda; McManus, Marcelle; Dunkley, Derrick.

21st Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference: 10th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. Vol. 4 U. S. A. : American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2016. p. V004Y05A034 DETC2016-59888.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lattanzio, S, Newnes, L, McManus, M & Dunkley, D 2016, Life cycle decision support tools: The use of quality management techniques in combating decision tool 'performance decay'. in 21st Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference: 10th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. vol. 4, DETC2016-59888, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), U. S. A., pp. V004Y05A034, ASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016, Charlotte, USA United States, 21/08/16. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-59888
Lattanzio S, Newnes L, McManus M, Dunkley D. Life cycle decision support tools: The use of quality management techniques in combating decision tool 'performance decay'. In 21st Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference: 10th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. Vol. 4. U. S. A.: American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2016. p. V004Y05A034. DETC2016-59888 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-59888
Lattanzio, Susan ; Newnes, Linda ; McManus, Marcelle ; Dunkley, Derrick. / Life cycle decision support tools : The use of quality management techniques in combating decision tool 'performance decay'. 21st Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference: 10th International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems. Vol. 4 U. S. A. : American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2016. pp. V004Y05A034
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