LED optical excitation for the long pulse and lock-in thermographic techniques

S.G. Pickering, K. Chatterjee, D.P. Almond, S. Tuli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)
71 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

High power light emitting diode (LED) arrays have been investigated as excitation sources for long pulse and lock-in thermography. Images of artificial defects in a carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite sample are compared, by image contrast signal-to-noise ratio estimates, with those obtained using conventional incandescent flash and lock-in excitation sources. The LED arrays had to be mounted on heat sinks with active cooling in to prevent them exceeding their thermal tolerance. Despite this cooling the LED arrays were still found to emit some IR radiation, although far less than conventional incandescent light sources.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-77
Number of pages6
JournalNDT and E International
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Photoexcitation
Light emitting diodes
light emitting diodes
pulses
excitation
Cooling
cooling
carbon fiber reinforced plastics
Carbon fiber reinforced plastics
heat sinks
Heat sinks
image contrast
flash
Light sources
Signal to noise ratio
light sources
signal to noise ratios
Infrared radiation
Defects
composite materials

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LED optical excitation for the long pulse and lock-in thermographic techniques. / Pickering, S.G.; Chatterjee, K.; Almond, D.P.; Tuli, S.

In: NDT and E International, Vol. 58, 09.2013, p. 72-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pickering, S.G. ; Chatterjee, K. ; Almond, D.P. ; Tuli, S. / LED optical excitation for the long pulse and lock-in thermographic techniques. In: NDT and E International. 2013 ; Vol. 58. pp. 72-77.
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