Large Scale Application of Self-Healing Concrete: Design, Construction and Testing

Robert Davies, Oliver Teall, Martins Pilegis, Antonios Kanellopoulos, Trupti Sharma, Anthony Jefferson, Diane Gardner, Abir Al-Tabbaa, Kevin Paine, Robert Lark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Materials for Life (M4L) was a 3 year, EPSRC funded, research project carried out by the Universities of Cardiff, Bath and Cambridge to investigate the development of self-healing cementitious construction materials. This paper describes the UK’s first site trial of self-healing concrete, which was the culmination of that project.
The trial comprised the in-situ construction of five concrete panels using a range of self-healing technologies within the site compound of the A465 Heads of the Valleys Highway upgrading project. Four self-healing techniques were used both individually and in combination with one another. They were: (i) the use of microcapsules developed by the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with industry, containing mineral healing agents, (ii) bacterial healing using the expertise developed at Bath University, (iii) the use of a shape memory polymer (SMP) based system for crack closure and (iv) the delivery of a mineral healing agent through a vascular flow network. Both of the latter, (iii) and (iv), were the product of research undertaken at Cardiff University.
This paper describes the design, construction, testing and monitoring of these trial panels and presents the primary findings of the exercise. The challenges that had to be overcome to incorporate these self-healing techniques into full-scale structures on a live construction site are highlighted, the impact of the different techniques on the behaviour of the panels when subject to loading is presented and the ability of the techniques used to heal the cracks that were generated is discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Article number51
JournalFrontiers in Materials
Volume5
Early online date4 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Sep 2018

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Concretes
Testing
Self-healing materials
Minerals
Crack closure
Shape memory effect
Cracks
Monitoring
Polymers
Industry

Cite this

Davies, R., Teall, O., Pilegis, M., Kanellopoulos, A., Sharma, T., Jefferson, A., ... Lark, R. (2018). Large Scale Application of Self-Healing Concrete: Design, Construction and Testing. Frontiers in Materials, 5, [51]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmats.2018.00051

Large Scale Application of Self-Healing Concrete: Design, Construction and Testing. / Davies, Robert; Teall, Oliver; Pilegis, Martins; Kanellopoulos, Antonios; Sharma, Trupti; Jefferson, Anthony; Gardner, Diane; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Paine, Kevin; Lark, Robert.

In: Frontiers in Materials, Vol. 5, 51, 04.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davies, R, Teall, O, Pilegis, M, Kanellopoulos, A, Sharma, T, Jefferson, A, Gardner, D, Al-Tabbaa, A, Paine, K & Lark, R 2018, 'Large Scale Application of Self-Healing Concrete: Design, Construction and Testing', Frontiers in Materials, vol. 5, 51. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmats.2018.00051
Davies R, Teall O, Pilegis M, Kanellopoulos A, Sharma T, Jefferson A et al. Large Scale Application of Self-Healing Concrete: Design, Construction and Testing. Frontiers in Materials. 2018 Sep 4;5. 51. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmats.2018.00051
Davies, Robert ; Teall, Oliver ; Pilegis, Martins ; Kanellopoulos, Antonios ; Sharma, Trupti ; Jefferson, Anthony ; Gardner, Diane ; Al-Tabbaa, Abir ; Paine, Kevin ; Lark, Robert. / Large Scale Application of Self-Healing Concrete: Design, Construction and Testing. In: Frontiers in Materials. 2018 ; Vol. 5.
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