It's Good to be First

Order Bias in Reading and Citing NBER Working Papers.

Dan Feenberg, Ina Ganguli, Patrick Gaule, Jonathan Gruber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When choices are made from ordered lists, individuals can exhibit biases toward selecting certain options as a result of the ordering. We examine this phenomenon in the context of consumer response to the ordering of economics papers in an e-mail announcement issued by the NBER. We show that despite the effectively random list placement, papers listed first each week are about 30% more likely to be viewed, downloaded, and subsequently cited. We suggest that a model of “skimming” behavior, where individuals focus on the first few papers in the list due to time constraints, would be most consistent with our findings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-39
Number of pages7
JournalReview of Economics and Statistics
Volume99
Issue number1
Early online date23 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

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Cite this

It's Good to be First : Order Bias in Reading and Citing NBER Working Papers. / Feenberg, Dan; Ganguli, Ina ; Gaule, Patrick; Gruber, Jonathan.

In: Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 99, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 32-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feenberg, Dan ; Ganguli, Ina ; Gaule, Patrick ; Gruber, Jonathan. / It's Good to be First : Order Bias in Reading and Citing NBER Working Papers. In: Review of Economics and Statistics. 2017 ; Vol. 99, No. 1. pp. 32-39.
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