Introduction to the Special Section

Social Movements and Social Emancipation in Latin America

Ana C. Dinerstein, Sara C. Motta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

‘Emancipation’ remains marginal as a theme within Latin American studies (LAS) with the focus on questions of institutional politics, democracy, democratization, citizenship and development. Yet for the past two decades social movements have been articulating new imaginaries, ideas and practices beyond traditionally conceived frameworks of social change. They are anticipating alternative arrangements towards a dignified collective life. In these alternative possibilities, emancipation does not allude to a revolutionary process to take the power of the state, but denotes other horizons that in principle transcend the state as the main locus of struggle. These movements pose methodological, theoretical and epistemological challenges to the study of Latin America.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberBLAR12525
Pages (from-to)3–4
JournalBulletin of Latin American Research
Volume36
Issue number1
Early online date25 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
EventSLAS Annual Conference 2012, -
Duration: 11 Apr 201213 May 2012

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social movement
emancipation
Social Movements
Latin America
democratization
social change
citizenship
democracy
politics

Keywords

  • social movements
  • epistemology
  • latin america
  • Bolivia
  • argentina
  • Brazil
  • Colombia
  • pedagogical
  • land
  • the law

Cite this

Introduction to the Special Section : Social Movements and Social Emancipation in Latin America. / Dinerstein, Ana C.; Motta, Sara C.

In: Bulletin of Latin American Research, Vol. 36, No. 1, BLAR12525, 01.01.2017, p. 3–4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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