Introduction of optical Newton Cradle model for understanding the N-solitons fission process under the action of higher order dispersion

R. Driben, B.A. Malomed, D.V. Skryabin, A.V. Yulin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A mechanism of creating a Newton's cradle (NC) in the form of a chain of solitons is proposed for understanding fission of higher-order soliton in optical fibers caused by higher-order dispersion. After the transformation of the initial Nsoliton into a chain of fundamental quasi-solitons, the tallest one travels along the chain through elastic collisions with other solitons, and then escapes, while the other solitons remain in a bound state. Multiple releases of solitons take place if N is sufficiently large. The NC effect is robust against inclusion of the Raman and self-steepening terms.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNonlinear Optics and Applications VII
EditorsM Bertolotti, J Haus, A Zheltikov
Place of PublicationBellingham, WA
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Print)9780819495747
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventNonlinear Optics and Applications VII - Prague, Czech Republic
Duration: 15 Apr 201317 Apr 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
Volume8772
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceNonlinear Optics and Applications VII
CountryCzech Republic
CityPrague
Period15/04/1317/04/13

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    Driben, R., Malomed, B. A., Skryabin, D. V., & Yulin, A. V. (2013). Introduction of optical Newton Cradle model for understanding the N-solitons fission process under the action of higher order dispersion. In M. Bertolotti, J. Haus, & A. Zheltikov (Eds.), Nonlinear Optics and Applications VII (Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 8772). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2017616