Introduction of an Alcohol-Related Electronic Screening and Brief Intervention (eSBI) Program to Reduce Hazardous Alcohol Consumption in Namibia’s Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Program

A. M. Tang, N. Hamunime, R. A. Adams, G. Kanyinga, C. Fischer-Walker, S. Agolory, D. Prybylski, N. Mutenda, S. Sughrue, D. D. Walker, T. Rennie, M. Zahralban-Steele, A. Kerrigan, S. Y. Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Alcohol is the most widely abused substance in Namibia and is associated with poor adherence and retention in care among people on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Electronic screening and brief interventions (eSBI) are effective in reducing alcohol consumption in various contexts. We used a mixed methods approach to develop, implement, and evaluate the introduction of an eSBI in two ART clinics in Namibia. Of the 787 participants, 45% reported some alcohol use in the past 12 months and 25% reported hazardous drinking levels. Hazardous drinkers were more likely to be male, separated/widowed/divorced, have a monthly household income > $1000 NAD, and report less than excellent ART adherence. Based on qualitative feedback from participants and providers, ART patients using the eSBI for the first time found it to be a positive and beneficial experience. However, we identified several programmatic considerations that could improve the experience and yield in future implementation studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3078-3092
Number of pages15
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume23
Issue number11
Early online date23 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • HIV
  • Namibia
  • Screening and brief intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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