Introducing research initiatives into healthcare: what do doctors think?

Lucy Wyld, Sian Smith, Nicholas J Hawkins, Janet Long, Robyn L Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Current national and international policies emphasize the need to develop research initiatives within our health care system. Institutional biobanking represents a modern, large-scale research initiative that is reliant upon the support of several aspects of the health care organization. This research project aims to explore doctors' views on the concept of institutional biobanking and to gain insight into the factors which impact the development of research initiatives within healthcare systems.

METHODS: Qualitative research study using semi-structured interviews. The research was conducted across two public teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia where institutional biobanking was being introduced. Twenty-five participants were interviewed, of whom 21 were medical practitioners at the specialist trainee level or above in a specialty directly related to biobanking; four were key stakeholders responsible for the design and implementation of the biobanking initiative.

RESULTS: All participants strongly supported the concept of institutional biobanking. Participants highlighted the discordance between the doctors who work to establish the biobank (the contributors) and the researchers who use it (the consumers). Participants identified several barriers that limit the success of research initiatives in the hospital setting including: the 'resistance to change' culture; the difficulties in engaging health professionals in research initiatives; and the lack of incentives offered to doctors for their contribution. Doctors positively valued the opportunity to advise the implementation team, and felt that the initiative could benefit from their knowledge and expertise.

CONCLUSION: Successful integration of research initiatives into hospitals requires early collaboration between the implementing team and the health care professionals to produce a plan that is sensitive to the needs of the health professionals and tailored to the hospital setting. Research initiatives must consider incentives that encourage doctors to adopt operational responsibility for hospital research initiatives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-8
Number of pages8
JournalBiopreservation and biobanking
Volume12
Issue number2
Early online date21 Apr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Academies and Institutes
  • Biological Specimen Banks/standards
  • Female
  • Hospitals, Teaching
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Male
  • Physicians/psychology
  • Research/standards

Cite this

Introducing research initiatives into healthcare : what do doctors think? / Wyld, Lucy; Smith, Sian; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Long, Janet; Ward, Robyn L.

In: Biopreservation and biobanking, Vol. 12, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 91-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wyld, Lucy ; Smith, Sian ; Hawkins, Nicholas J ; Long, Janet ; Ward, Robyn L. / Introducing research initiatives into healthcare : what do doctors think?. In: Biopreservation and biobanking. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 91-8.
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