Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda

T S Betancourt, Timothy P Williams, S E Kellner, J Gebre-Medhin, K Hann, Y Kayiteshonga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the core components of children's basic security and well-being in order to examine issues central to improving child protection in Rwanda. Sources of data included 15 focus groups with adults, 7 focus groups with children ages 10-17, and 11 key informant interviews with child protection stakeholders, including representatives from international NGOs, community-based groups, and the Rwandan Government, all of which took place in April and May of 2010. Participants painted a complex picture of threats to children's basic security in Rwanda. Three key themes were pervasive across all interviews: (1) deterioration of social and community cohesion in post-genocide Rwanda; (2) the cascading effects of poverty; and (3) the impact of caregiver illness and death on the caregiving environment. Consistent with the SAFE (Safety/freedom from harm; Access to basic physiological needs and healthcare; Family and connection to others; Education and economic security) model of child protection, participants rarely elaborated on a child protection threat independent of other basic security needs and rights. Findings suggest a need for integrated approaches to child protection that recognize this interrelatedness and extend beyond issue-specific child protection responses. This study contributes to a growing body of work highlighting the interrelated nature of child protection threats and the implications of adaptive and dangerous survival strategies that children and families engage in to meet their basic security needs. Analysis of this interrelatedness provides a roadmap for improving policies and implementing integrated and robust child protection strategies in Rwanda and other settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1504-1511
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume74
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Rwanda
child protection
well-being
health
threat
Focus Groups
survival strategy
Child Health
Well-being
Children's Health
Child Protection
Group
genocide
caregiving
Genocide
interview
group cohesion
Interviews
non-governmental organization
community

Cite this

Betancourt, T. S., Williams, T. P., Kellner, S. E., Gebre-Medhin, J., Hann, K., & Kayiteshonga, Y. (2012). Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda. Social Science and Medicine, 74(10), 1504-1511. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.030

Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda. / Betancourt, T S; Williams, Timothy P; Kellner, S E; Gebre-Medhin, J; Hann, K; Kayiteshonga, Y.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 74, No. 10, 05.2012, p. 1504-1511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Betancourt, TS, Williams, TP, Kellner, SE, Gebre-Medhin, J, Hann, K & Kayiteshonga, Y 2012, 'Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda', Social Science and Medicine, vol. 74, no. 10, pp. 1504-1511. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.030
Betancourt, T S ; Williams, Timothy P ; Kellner, S E ; Gebre-Medhin, J ; Hann, K ; Kayiteshonga, Y. / Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 74, No. 10. pp. 1504-1511.
@article{724826340150421cbc1ccd8a70b2171b,
title = "Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda",
abstract = "This study examines the core components of children's basic security and well-being in order to examine issues central to improving child protection in Rwanda. Sources of data included 15 focus groups with adults, 7 focus groups with children ages 10-17, and 11 key informant interviews with child protection stakeholders, including representatives from international NGOs, community-based groups, and the Rwandan Government, all of which took place in April and May of 2010. Participants painted a complex picture of threats to children's basic security in Rwanda. Three key themes were pervasive across all interviews: (1) deterioration of social and community cohesion in post-genocide Rwanda; (2) the cascading effects of poverty; and (3) the impact of caregiver illness and death on the caregiving environment. Consistent with the SAFE (Safety/freedom from harm; Access to basic physiological needs and healthcare; Family and connection to others; Education and economic security) model of child protection, participants rarely elaborated on a child protection threat independent of other basic security needs and rights. Findings suggest a need for integrated approaches to child protection that recognize this interrelatedness and extend beyond issue-specific child protection responses. This study contributes to a growing body of work highlighting the interrelated nature of child protection threats and the implications of adaptive and dangerous survival strategies that children and families engage in to meet their basic security needs. Analysis of this interrelatedness provides a roadmap for improving policies and implementing integrated and robust child protection strategies in Rwanda and other settings.",
author = "Betancourt, {T S} and Williams, {Timothy P} and Kellner, {S E} and J Gebre-Medhin and K Hann and Y Kayiteshonga",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.030",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "1504--1511",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interrelatedness of child health, protection and well-being: An application of the SAFE model in Rwanda

AU - Betancourt, T S

AU - Williams, Timothy P

AU - Kellner, S E

AU - Gebre-Medhin, J

AU - Hann, K

AU - Kayiteshonga, Y

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - This study examines the core components of children's basic security and well-being in order to examine issues central to improving child protection in Rwanda. Sources of data included 15 focus groups with adults, 7 focus groups with children ages 10-17, and 11 key informant interviews with child protection stakeholders, including representatives from international NGOs, community-based groups, and the Rwandan Government, all of which took place in April and May of 2010. Participants painted a complex picture of threats to children's basic security in Rwanda. Three key themes were pervasive across all interviews: (1) deterioration of social and community cohesion in post-genocide Rwanda; (2) the cascading effects of poverty; and (3) the impact of caregiver illness and death on the caregiving environment. Consistent with the SAFE (Safety/freedom from harm; Access to basic physiological needs and healthcare; Family and connection to others; Education and economic security) model of child protection, participants rarely elaborated on a child protection threat independent of other basic security needs and rights. Findings suggest a need for integrated approaches to child protection that recognize this interrelatedness and extend beyond issue-specific child protection responses. This study contributes to a growing body of work highlighting the interrelated nature of child protection threats and the implications of adaptive and dangerous survival strategies that children and families engage in to meet their basic security needs. Analysis of this interrelatedness provides a roadmap for improving policies and implementing integrated and robust child protection strategies in Rwanda and other settings.

AB - This study examines the core components of children's basic security and well-being in order to examine issues central to improving child protection in Rwanda. Sources of data included 15 focus groups with adults, 7 focus groups with children ages 10-17, and 11 key informant interviews with child protection stakeholders, including representatives from international NGOs, community-based groups, and the Rwandan Government, all of which took place in April and May of 2010. Participants painted a complex picture of threats to children's basic security in Rwanda. Three key themes were pervasive across all interviews: (1) deterioration of social and community cohesion in post-genocide Rwanda; (2) the cascading effects of poverty; and (3) the impact of caregiver illness and death on the caregiving environment. Consistent with the SAFE (Safety/freedom from harm; Access to basic physiological needs and healthcare; Family and connection to others; Education and economic security) model of child protection, participants rarely elaborated on a child protection threat independent of other basic security needs and rights. Findings suggest a need for integrated approaches to child protection that recognize this interrelatedness and extend beyond issue-specific child protection responses. This study contributes to a growing body of work highlighting the interrelated nature of child protection threats and the implications of adaptive and dangerous survival strategies that children and families engage in to meet their basic security needs. Analysis of this interrelatedness provides a roadmap for improving policies and implementing integrated and robust child protection strategies in Rwanda and other settings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859757278&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.030

U2 - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.030

DO - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.030

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 1504

EP - 1511

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 10

ER -