Interpreting technology-mediated identity: Perception of social intention and meaning in Bluetooth names

Freya Palmer, Eamonn O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

The ubiquitous and highly personal nature of mobile devices, together with the partially embodied nature of Bluetooth, means that mobile device based Bluetooth provides unique affordances for communicating aspects of identity. We report a study of how people interpret Bluetooth names in terms of social identity, considering it as an example of mobile technology-mediated identity. We used card-sorting, hierarchical cluster analysis, multi-dimensional scaling and qualitative analysis to establish perceived types of Bluetooth name and dimensions of naming; illustrating how people conceptualise and interpret technology-mediated identity projected by others.
Original languageEnglish
Pages232-239
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Dec 2010
EventOZCHI '10 (22nd Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group (CHISIG)) - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 22 Nov 201026 Nov 2010

Conference

ConferenceOZCHI '10 (22nd Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group (CHISIG))
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period22/11/1026/11/10

Keywords

  • Social Identity
  • Bluetooth
  • Digital Identity

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    Palmer, F., & O'Neill, E. (2010). Interpreting technology-mediated identity: Perception of social intention and meaning in Bluetooth names. 232-239. Paper presented at OZCHI '10 (22nd Annual Conference of the Australian Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group (CHISIG)), Brisbane, Australia. https://doi.org/10.1145/1952222.1952273