Integrating a web-based self-management tool (managing joint pain on the web and through resources) for people with osteoarthritis-related joint pain with a web-based social network support tool (generating engagement in network involvement): Design, development, and early evaluation

Paul Clarkson, Ivaylo Vassilev, Anne Rogers, Charlotte Brooks, Nicky Wilson, Jem Lawson, Jo Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Background: Joint pain caused by osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and can be extremely debilitating. Programs to support self-management of joint pain can be effective; however, most programs are designed to build self-efficacy and rarely engage social networks. Digital interventions are considered acceptable by people with joint pain. However, many existing resources are not accessible for or developed alongside people with lower health literacy, which disproportionately affects people with OA. Objective: This study aims to design and develop an accessible digital self-management tool for people with joint pain and integrate this with an existing social network activation tool (Generating Engagement in Network Involvement [GENIE]) and to explore the feasibility of these linked tools for supporting the management of joint pain. Methods: The study was conducted in 2 phases: A design and development stage and a small-scale evaluation. The first phase followed the person-based approach to establish guiding principles for the development of a new site (Managing joint Pain On the Web and through Resources [EMPOWER]) and its integration with GENIE. People with joint pain were recruited from libraries, a community café, and an exercise scheme to take part in 3 focus groups. EMPOWER was tested and refined using think-aloud interviews (n=6). In the second phase, participants were recruited through the web via libraries to participate in a small-scale evaluation using the LifeGuide platform to record use over a 1-month period. Participants (n=6) were asked to complete evaluation questionnaires on their experiences. The NASSS (nonadoption, abandonment, scale-up, spread, and sustainability) framework was used to explore the feasibility of the sites. Results: The focus groups established guiding principles for the development of the tool. These included ensuring accessibility and relevance for people with OA-related joint pain and recognizing that joint pain is the reason for seeking support, trust, social facilitation, and goal setting. Think-aloud interviews identified issues with user experience and site navigation and the need for professional input for referral and goal setting, confusion, and tensions over the role of GENIE and site connectivity. Participants expected the sites to be specific to their pain-related needs. EMPOWER was accessed 18 times; 6 users registered with the site during the evaluation study. Participants mostly explored information pages on being active and being a healthy weight. Only one participant undertook goal setting and 4 participants visited the GENIE website. Conclusions: Using the NASSS framework, we identified the complexity associated with integrating EMPOWER and GENIE. The value proposition domain highlighted the technical and conceptual complexity associated with integrating approaches. Although identified as theoretically achievable, the integration of differing propositions may have caused cognitive and practical burdens for users. Nevertheless, we believe that both approaches have a distinct role in the self-management of joint pain.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere18565
JournalJMIR Formative Research
Volume4
Issue number11
Early online date5 Mar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This report is an independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care and Applied Research Collaboration Wessex. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the National Institute for Health Research or the Department of Health and Social Care. The authors would like to thank Dr Ingrid Muller for her input into the project, Arthritis Australia, and all of the participants who participated in the studies.

Keywords

  • Internet
  • Joint pain
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Self-management
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Integrating a web-based self-management tool (managing joint pain on the web and through resources) for people with osteoarthritis-related joint pain with a web-based social network support tool (generating engagement in network involvement): Design, development, and early evaluation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this