Inspiratory loading intensity does not influence lactate clearance during recovery

Micahel A. Johnson, Dean E. Mills, David M. Brown, Katie J. Bayfield, Javier T. Gonzalez, Graham R. Sharpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE:
This study examined the effects of different pressure threshold inspiratory loads on lactate clearance and plasma acid-base balance during recovery from maximal exercise.
METHODS:
Eight moderately trained males (V˙O(2peak) = 4.29 ± 0.46 L·min⁻¹) performed, on different days, four maximal incremental cycling tests (power started at 0 W and increased by 20 W·min⁻¹) of identical duration (exercise time during the first trial was 16.32 ± 1.12 min). During 20-min recovery, subjects either rested passively or breathed through a constant pressure threshold inspiratory load of 10 (ITL10), 15 (ITL15), or 20 (ITL20) cm H2O. Plasma lactate concentration ([La⁻]) was measured, and acid-base balance was quantified using the physicochemical approach, which describes the dependency of [H⁺] on the three independent variables: strong ion difference ([Na⁺] + [K⁺] - [Cl⁻] + [La⁻]), the total concentration of weak acids, and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide.
RESULTS:
Peak exercise responses were not significantly different between trials. During recovery, the area under the plasma [La] curve was not different between trials (pooled mean = 261 ± 60 mEq) and the [La] measured at the end of the 20-min recovery was also similar (passive recovery = 9.2 ± 3.1 mEq·L⁻¹, ITL10 = 9.3 ± 3.1 mEq·L⁻¹, ITL15 = 8.7 ± 2.8 mEq·L⁻¹, ITL20 = 8.7 ± 3.2 mEq·L⁻¹). Similarly, changes in other strong ions contributing to strong ion difference and total concentration of weak acids, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and, therefore, [H⁺] were not different between trials.
CONCLUSIONS:
These data suggest that, in individuals of moderate endurance training status, inspiratory loading at the intensities used in the present study does not accelerate lactate clearance or modify plasma acid-base balance during recovery from maximal exercise.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-871
JournalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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