Influence and autonomy? The territorial dynamic of ideas in the Labour Party and Parti Socialiste

David Moon, Øivind Bratberg

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Britain, Spain, Italy and France have to varying degrees become regionalised states where subnational assemblies have extensive political powers that still fall short of the constitutional entrenchment characterising federations. In this context, political parties balance between the inclination to centralise power and the requirement to diversify across territorial boundaries. In previous works, we have discussed the concept of the ‘multi-level party’ (MLP), arguing that it should be analysed in its ideational as well as organisational aspects. In the present paper we engage with what is often referred to as the influence of constituent party units vis-à-vis the statewide party. In the literature on devolution in Britain, for example, the autonomy (in ideational and policyterms) of party branches in Scotland and Wales is covered extensively. What is less discussed and conceptualised is the capacity for their ideational influence on statewide party policy. Our paper considers and compares the British Labour Party and the French Parti Socialiste against this backdrop – two parties with shared family credentials but differing organisation and which inhabit rather different territorial settlements today.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2015
EventPolitical Studies Association conference - Town Hall and City Hall, Sheffield, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 30 Mar 20151 Apr 2015

Conference

ConferencePolitical Studies Association conference
CountryUK United Kingdom
CitySheffield
Period30/03/151/04/15

Fingerprint

Labour Party
autonomy
political power
federation
decentralization
Italy
Spain
France
literature

Keywords

  • multi-level party
  • British Labour Party
  • Labour Party
  • British Politics
  • French Politics
  • Devolution

Cite this

Moon, D., & Bratberg, Ø. (2015). Influence and autonomy? The territorial dynamic of ideas in the Labour Party and Parti Socialiste. Paper presented at Political Studies Association conference, Sheffield, UK United Kingdom.

Influence and autonomy? The territorial dynamic of ideas in the Labour Party and Parti Socialiste. / Moon, David; Bratberg, Øivind.

2015. Paper presented at Political Studies Association conference, Sheffield, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Moon, D & Bratberg, Ø 2015, 'Influence and autonomy? The territorial dynamic of ideas in the Labour Party and Parti Socialiste', Paper presented at Political Studies Association conference, Sheffield, UK United Kingdom, 30/03/15 - 1/04/15.
Moon D, Bratberg Ø. Influence and autonomy? The territorial dynamic of ideas in the Labour Party and Parti Socialiste. 2015. Paper presented at Political Studies Association conference, Sheffield, UK United Kingdom.
Moon, David ; Bratberg, Øivind. / Influence and autonomy? The territorial dynamic of ideas in the Labour Party and Parti Socialiste. Paper presented at Political Studies Association conference, Sheffield, UK United Kingdom.
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