Individualism and the extended-self: cross-cultural differences in the valuation of authentic objects

Nathalia L Gjersoe, George E Newman, Vladimir Chituc, Bruce Hood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The current studies examine how valuation of authentic items varies as a function of culture. We find that U.S. respondents value authentic items associated with individual persons (a sweater or an artwork) more than Indian respondents, but that both cultures value authentic objects not associated with persons (a dinosaur bone or a moon rock) equally. These differences cannot be attributed to more general cultural differences in the value assigned to authenticity. Rather, the results support the hypothesis that individualistic cultures place a greater value on objects associated with unique persons and in so doing, offer the first evidence for how valuation of certain authentic items may vary cross-culturally.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere90787
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2014

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Cross-Cultural Comparison
  • Culture
  • Female
  • Humans
  • India
  • Individuality
  • Male
  • Social Values
  • United States

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