Individual and combined effects of cannabis and tobacco on drug reward processing in non-dependent users

Chandni Hindocha, Will Lawn, Tom P Freeman, H Valerie Curran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RATIONALE: Cannabis and tobacco are often smoked simultaneously in joints, and this practice may increase the risks of developing tobacco and/or cannabis use disorders. Currently, there is no human experimental research on how these drugs interact on addiction-related measures.

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate how cannabis and tobacco, each alone and combined together in joints, affected individuals' demand for cannabis puffs and cigarettes, explicit liking of drug and non-drug-related stimuli and craving.

METHOD: A double-blind, 2 (active cannabis, placebo cannabis) × 2 (active tobacco, placebo tobacco) crossover design was used with 24 non-dependent cannabis and tobacco smokers. They completed a pleasantness rating task (PRT), a marijuana purchase task (MPT) and a cigarette purchase task (CPT) alongside measures of craving pre- and post-drug administration.

RESULTS: Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-associated stimuli and increased response time to all stimuli except cigarette-related stimuli. Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis decreased demand for cannabis puffs (trends for breakpoint and elasticity) and cigarettes (breakpoint, P max, O max) on several characteristics of the purchase tasks. We found no evidence that active tobacco, both alone or combined with cannabis, had an effect on liking, demand or craving.

CONCLUSIONS: Acutely, cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-related stimuli and demand for cannabis itself. Acute cannabis also reduced demand for cigarettes on the CPT. Acute tobacco administration did not affect demand or pleasantness ratings for cigarettes themselves or cannabis. In non-dependent cannabis and tobacco co-users, tobacco did not influence the rewarding effects of cannabis.

LanguageEnglish
Pages3153-3163
Number of pages11
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume234
Issue number21
Early online date22 Jul 2017
DOIs
StatusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Reward
Tobacco
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Tobacco Products
Placebos
Joints

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Behavior, Addictive/psychology
  • Craving/drug effects
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Dronabinol/pharmacology
  • Drug Synergism
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Marijuana Abuse/psychology
  • Marijuana Smoking/psychology
  • Motivation/drug effects
  • Nicotine/pharmacology
  • Reaction Time/drug effects
  • Reward
  • Smoking/psychology
  • Tobacco Use Disorder/psychology
  • Young Adult

Cite this

Individual and combined effects of cannabis and tobacco on drug reward processing in non-dependent users. / Hindocha, Chandni; Lawn, Will; Freeman, Tom P; Curran, H Valerie.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 234, No. 21, 01.11.2017, p. 3153-3163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hindocha, Chandni ; Lawn, Will ; Freeman, Tom P ; Curran, H Valerie. / Individual and combined effects of cannabis and tobacco on drug reward processing in non-dependent users. In: Psychopharmacology. 2017 ; Vol. 234, No. 21. pp. 3153-3163.
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abstract = "RATIONALE: Cannabis and tobacco are often smoked simultaneously in joints, and this practice may increase the risks of developing tobacco and/or cannabis use disorders. Currently, there is no human experimental research on how these drugs interact on addiction-related measures.OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate how cannabis and tobacco, each alone and combined together in joints, affected individuals' demand for cannabis puffs and cigarettes, explicit liking of drug and non-drug-related stimuli and craving.METHOD: A double-blind, 2 (active cannabis, placebo cannabis) × 2 (active tobacco, placebo tobacco) crossover design was used with 24 non-dependent cannabis and tobacco smokers. They completed a pleasantness rating task (PRT), a marijuana purchase task (MPT) and a cigarette purchase task (CPT) alongside measures of craving pre- and post-drug administration.RESULTS: Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-associated stimuli and increased response time to all stimuli except cigarette-related stimuli. Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis decreased demand for cannabis puffs (trends for breakpoint and elasticity) and cigarettes (breakpoint, P max, O max) on several characteristics of the purchase tasks. We found no evidence that active tobacco, both alone or combined with cannabis, had an effect on liking, demand or craving.CONCLUSIONS: Acutely, cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-related stimuli and demand for cannabis itself. Acute cannabis also reduced demand for cigarettes on the CPT. Acute tobacco administration did not affect demand or pleasantness ratings for cigarettes themselves or cannabis. In non-dependent cannabis and tobacco co-users, tobacco did not influence the rewarding effects of cannabis.",
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T1 - Individual and combined effects of cannabis and tobacco on drug reward processing in non-dependent users

AU - Hindocha, Chandni

AU - Lawn, Will

AU - Freeman, Tom P

AU - Curran, H Valerie

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - RATIONALE: Cannabis and tobacco are often smoked simultaneously in joints, and this practice may increase the risks of developing tobacco and/or cannabis use disorders. Currently, there is no human experimental research on how these drugs interact on addiction-related measures.OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate how cannabis and tobacco, each alone and combined together in joints, affected individuals' demand for cannabis puffs and cigarettes, explicit liking of drug and non-drug-related stimuli and craving.METHOD: A double-blind, 2 (active cannabis, placebo cannabis) × 2 (active tobacco, placebo tobacco) crossover design was used with 24 non-dependent cannabis and tobacco smokers. They completed a pleasantness rating task (PRT), a marijuana purchase task (MPT) and a cigarette purchase task (CPT) alongside measures of craving pre- and post-drug administration.RESULTS: Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-associated stimuli and increased response time to all stimuli except cigarette-related stimuli. Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis decreased demand for cannabis puffs (trends for breakpoint and elasticity) and cigarettes (breakpoint, P max, O max) on several characteristics of the purchase tasks. We found no evidence that active tobacco, both alone or combined with cannabis, had an effect on liking, demand or craving.CONCLUSIONS: Acutely, cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-related stimuli and demand for cannabis itself. Acute cannabis also reduced demand for cigarettes on the CPT. Acute tobacco administration did not affect demand or pleasantness ratings for cigarettes themselves or cannabis. In non-dependent cannabis and tobacco co-users, tobacco did not influence the rewarding effects of cannabis.

AB - RATIONALE: Cannabis and tobacco are often smoked simultaneously in joints, and this practice may increase the risks of developing tobacco and/or cannabis use disorders. Currently, there is no human experimental research on how these drugs interact on addiction-related measures.OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate how cannabis and tobacco, each alone and combined together in joints, affected individuals' demand for cannabis puffs and cigarettes, explicit liking of drug and non-drug-related stimuli and craving.METHOD: A double-blind, 2 (active cannabis, placebo cannabis) × 2 (active tobacco, placebo tobacco) crossover design was used with 24 non-dependent cannabis and tobacco smokers. They completed a pleasantness rating task (PRT), a marijuana purchase task (MPT) and a cigarette purchase task (CPT) alongside measures of craving pre- and post-drug administration.RESULTS: Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-associated stimuli and increased response time to all stimuli except cigarette-related stimuli. Relative to placebo cannabis, active cannabis decreased demand for cannabis puffs (trends for breakpoint and elasticity) and cigarettes (breakpoint, P max, O max) on several characteristics of the purchase tasks. We found no evidence that active tobacco, both alone or combined with cannabis, had an effect on liking, demand or craving.CONCLUSIONS: Acutely, cannabis reduced liking of cannabis-related stimuli and demand for cannabis itself. Acute cannabis also reduced demand for cigarettes on the CPT. Acute tobacco administration did not affect demand or pleasantness ratings for cigarettes themselves or cannabis. In non-dependent cannabis and tobacco co-users, tobacco did not influence the rewarding effects of cannabis.

KW - Adult

KW - Behavior, Addictive/psychology

KW - Craving/drug effects

KW - Cross-Over Studies

KW - Double-Blind Method

KW - Dronabinol/pharmacology

KW - Drug Synergism

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Marijuana Abuse/psychology

KW - Marijuana Smoking/psychology

KW - Motivation/drug effects

KW - Nicotine/pharmacology

KW - Reaction Time/drug effects

KW - Reward

KW - Smoking/psychology

KW - Tobacco Use Disorder/psychology

KW - Young Adult

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DO - 10.1007/s00213-017-4698-2

M3 - Article

VL - 234

SP - 3153

EP - 3163

JO - Psychopharmacology

T2 - Psychopharmacology

JF - Psychopharmacology

SN - 0033-3158

IS - 21

ER -