In vitro optimization of Dexamethasone Phosphate delivery by iontophoresis

J -P Sylvestre, R H Guy, M B Delgado-Charro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of competing ions and electroosmosis on the transdermal iontophoresis of dexamethasone phosphate (Dex-Phos) and to identify the optimal conditions for its delivery. Methods. The experiments were performed using pig skin, in side-by-side diffusion cells (0.78 cm2), passing a constant current of 0.3 mA via Ag-AgCl electrodes. Dex-Phos transport was quantified for donor solutions (anodal and cathodal) containing different drug concentrations, with and without background electrolyte. Electrotransport of co-ion, citrate, and counterions Na and K also was quantified. The contribution of electroosmosis was evaluated by measuring the transport of the neutral marker (mannitol). Results. Electromigration was the dominant mechanism of drug iontophoresis, and reduction in electroosmotic flow directed against the cathodic delivery of Dex-Phos did not improve drug delivery. The Dex-Phos flux from the cathode was found to be optimal (transport number of 0.012) when background electrolyte was excluded from the formulation. In this case, transport of the drug is limited principally by the competition with counterions (mainly Na with a transport number of 0.8) and the mobility of the drug in the membrane. Discussion and Conclusion. Dex-Phos must be delivered from the cathode and formulated rationally, excluding mobile co-anions, to achieve optimal iontophoretic delivery.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1177-1185
Number of pages9
JournalPhysical Therapy
Volume88
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

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dexamethasone 21-phosphate
Iontophoresis
Electroosmosis
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Electrolytes
Electrodes
Ions
Mannitol
Citric Acid
Anions
Swine
In Vitro Techniques
Skin
Membranes

Cite this

In vitro optimization of Dexamethasone Phosphate delivery by iontophoresis. / Sylvestre, J -P; Guy, R H; Delgado-Charro, M B.

In: Physical Therapy, Vol. 88, No. 10, 10.2008, p. 1177-1185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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