In the face of dominance: Self-perceived and other-perceived dominance are positively associated with facial-width-to-height ratio in men

V. R. Mileva, M. L. Cowan, K. D. Cobey, K. K. Knowles, A. C. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent research, facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) has garnered considerable attention because it has been linked with different behavioural characteristics (e.g., achievement drive, deception, aggression). Here we examined whether other-perceptions and self-perceptions of dominance are related to fWHR. In study 1, we found that other-perceived dominance was positively associated with fWHR, but only in men. In studies 2 and 3, using two different self-perceived dominance scales, and two different samples of participants, we found that fWHR was positively related to self-perceived dominance, again only in men. There was no relationship between fWHR and self-perceived prestige scores. Consistent with previous work, we also found that there was no sexual dimorphism in fWHR across all three studies. Together these results suggest that fWHR may be a reliable cue to dominant social behaviour in men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-118
Number of pages4
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume69
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

Keywords

  • Dominance
  • Facial metrics
  • Facial width-to-height ratio
  • Prestige
  • Sexual dimorphism

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