Improving the uptake of NHS Health Checks in more deprived communities using 'outreach telephone calls' made by specialist health advocates from the same communities: A quantitative service evaluation'

Nicola Coghill, Ludivine Garside, Amanda Chappell

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Abstract

A Quantitative Service Evaluation of a Telephone Outreach Initiative to Enhance the Uptake of NHS Health Checks


Coghill N, Research Associate. School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol
Garside L, Research Associate. School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol

Aim
This study aimed to determine the efficacy of a telephone outreach service for inviting patients for an NHS health Check, in GP practices from the lowest super output areas of Bristol (LSOA).


Background
NHS Health Checks are offered to patients aged 40-74 who are not on a disease register. The main aim is to assess their risk of developing one of these diseases or conditions and provide support and advice to help them reduce or manage their risk, disease or condition. A recent study found that verbal and telephone invitations resulted in a greater likelihood of attendance for and NHS Health Check, compared to a written letter invitation, particularly in hard to reach groups.


Methodology
12 self-selected GP practises opted to use the telephone outreach initiative and five practices acted as controls. Rate of uptake, demographics, including IMD for the populations included and predictions for uptake were explored using STATA v13.1.


Results
Intervention practices were more successful at attracting ethnic minority patients to attend and complete their NHS Health Check (25.6%), compared to non-telephone outreach practices (7.2%).

However, intervention practices showed a, 24% rate of uptake compared to 36% in control practices.

Patients were more likely to attend their GP practice to complete their NHS Health Check, following their phone call if they were female, over aged 70 and less deprived.


Conclusions
Despite this initiative being offered only in the lowest LSOA’s in Bristol, it was still more likely to attract those least deprived populations. However, the telephone outreach initiative was more successful at attracting those form ethnic minority groups compared to control practises.


Key words: Primary care, NHS Health Checks, Ethnic minorities, low income
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNHS Health Checks Conference 2016: Getting serious about prevention
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2016
EventPublic Health England NHS Health Check National Conference 2016: Getting Serious About Prevention - London, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Mar 2016 → …

Conference

ConferencePublic Health England NHS Health Check National Conference 2016: Getting Serious About Prevention
CountryUK United Kingdom
Period1/03/16 → …

Keywords

  • NHS Health Checks
  • inequalities in health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Epidemiology

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