Impacts on work performance; what matters 6 months on?

G Wynne-Jones, Rhiannon Buck, A Varnava, C J Phillips, C J Main

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To establish whether self-reported health, perceptions of work and objective characteristics of work measured at baseline can predict performance at 6 months follow-up.

Methods: Self-completed questionnaires to assess health, objective characteristics of work and perceptions of work were completed at two public sector organizations. Follow-up questionnaires were completed at 6 months to assess workplace performance using a visual analogue scale for self-rated performance and the Stanford Presenteeism Scale 6 (SPS6).

Results: Five hundred and five employees completed questionnaires at baseline and 310 (61%) of these completed follow-up questionnaires. Psychological distress as measured with the General Health Questionnaire and perceptions of work predicted both self-rated performance and SPS6 score. Objective characteristics of work were relatively unimportant in the prediction of future performance.

Conclusions: This study has provided an initial indication of the factors that may predict performance at follow-up in the population studied. These findings may be used to generate hypotheses for future studies and highlights the need to assess a range of factors in relation to an individual's performance at work including health and perceptions of work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-208
Number of pages4
JournalOccupational Medicine
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

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Health
Public Sector
Work Performance
Visual Analog Scale
Workplace
Surveys and Questionnaires
Organizations
Psychology
Population
Presenteeism

Keywords

  • occupational epidemiology
  • work performance
  • workplace
  • employee health

Cite this

Wynne-Jones, G., Buck, R., Varnava, A., Phillips, C. J., & Main, C. J. (2011). Impacts on work performance; what matters 6 months on? Occupational Medicine, 61(3), 205-208. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqr005

Impacts on work performance; what matters 6 months on? / Wynne-Jones, G; Buck, Rhiannon; Varnava, A; Phillips, C J; Main, C J.

In: Occupational Medicine, Vol. 61, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 205-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wynne-Jones, G, Buck, R, Varnava, A, Phillips, CJ & Main, CJ 2011, 'Impacts on work performance; what matters 6 months on?', Occupational Medicine, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 205-208. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqr005
Wynne-Jones G, Buck R, Varnava A, Phillips CJ, Main CJ. Impacts on work performance; what matters 6 months on? Occupational Medicine. 2011 May;61(3):205-208. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqr005
Wynne-Jones, G ; Buck, Rhiannon ; Varnava, A ; Phillips, C J ; Main, C J. / Impacts on work performance; what matters 6 months on?. In: Occupational Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 61, No. 3. pp. 205-208.
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