Impact of directionality and heat treatment on machining of additively manufactured Inconel 718

Joe Betts, Sarah Glanvill, Alborz Shokrani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) can be used to produce near-net-shape Inconel 718 parts to minimise the material consumption and the machining required for fabricating parts. Compared to wrought Inconel 718, there are certain characteristics inherent to AM process. These are elongated microstructural grains in the build direction, skin effect and the possibility of semi-finish machining prior to heat treatment. Micro-scratch and end milling tests were used to investigate the impact of these AM specific characteristics on machining performance and compare it with wrought alloy. The analysis demonstrated that directionality, skin effect and heat treatment affect cutting forces and tool wear within the material. Using lubrication can minimise these variations.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCIRP Annals - Manufacturing Technology
Early online date27 Apr 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing
  • Cutting
  • Inconel 718

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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