Impact of arts participation on children’s achievement: A systematic literature review

Divya Jindal-Snape, Daniel Davies, Ros Scott, Anna Robb, Chris Murray, Chris Harkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reports on a systematic literature review to examine the association between children and young people’s participation in arts activities and their academic achievement. The 24 studies that met our criteria for inclusion and weight of evidence (2004-16) had mixed findings. Whilst many of the research designs employed would not meet positivist criteria for rigour – such as sample size, statistical significance and causality – typically required by public bodies to justify expenditure, there are examples throughout the literature reviewed of academically-related benefits to participants, such as increased confidence, creativity or more positive attitude towards their studies. Overall, there appears to be some justification from the literature for public investment in high-quality, long-term arts education programmes for children and young people in schools and community settings, on the basis of its potential to enhance academic achievement. However, there may be more intrinsic benefits to arts participation than the instrumental, essentially economic justification of improved academic standards.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-72
Number of pages14
JournalThinking Skills and Creativity
Volume29
Early online date23 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Jun 2018

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art
academic achievement
participation
art education
public investment
statistical significance
causality
research planning
creativity
expenditures
confidence
inclusion
school
community
evidence
economics
literature

Cite this

Impact of arts participation on children’s achievement: A systematic literature review. / Jindal-Snape, Divya ; Davies, Daniel; Scott, Ros; Robb, Anna; Murray, Chris; Harkins, Chris.

In: Thinking Skills and Creativity, Vol. 29, 23.06.2018, p. 59-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jindal-Snape, Divya ; Davies, Daniel ; Scott, Ros ; Robb, Anna ; Murray, Chris ; Harkins, Chris. / Impact of arts participation on children’s achievement: A systematic literature review. In: Thinking Skills and Creativity. 2018 ; Vol. 29. pp. 59-72.
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