Identifying key changes: the progress of cremation and its influence on music at funerals in England, 1874–2010

Brian Parsons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically, musical contributions to the Church of England funerals were marginalised by the constraints of the burial service. Challenged by the introduction of cremation in the 1880s, then in the twentieth century by advances in recording equipment and more recently through a trend to personalise funeral ceremonies, the choice of music performed at contemporary funerals has widened dramatically, frequently fusing the religious and secular. This article examines the impact that relocating the funeral from the church to the crematorium had on music-related funeral practices and the place of music at cremation services today. Developments occurring as part of the funeral reform movement and surveys revealing musical preferences are discussed, whilst the final section presents the analyses of music performed during a one-month period at a London crematorium.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-144
JournalMortality
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Identifying key changes: the progress of cremation and its influence on music at funerals in England, 1874–2010'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this