'I see her being obesed!': Public pedagogy, reality media and the obesity crisis

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108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years a proliferation of reality based media focusing on the body, diet and exercise have sought not only to entertain audiences, but also to operate as pedagogical sites through which to encourage populations to undertake surveillance of their own and others’ bodies in order to address a so-called ‘obesity epidemic’ sweeping across western society. This article examines how reality media function within a broader ‘surveillant assemblage’ (Haggerty and Ericson, 2000) of obesity. Specifically, the article explores how this assemblage functions through interdependent connections between parenting, social class and broader political discourses of parenting and health risks which produce affective relationalities of the body.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-21
Number of pages19
JournalHealth: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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Parenting
Teaching
Obesity
Social Class
Diet
health risk
social class
proliferation
surveillance
Health
Population
discourse

Cite this

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