'I don't really like it here but I don't want to be anywhere else': children and inner city council estates

Diane Reay, Helen Lucey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This paper explores the experiences of children living on inner London council estates. Prevalent discourses of social exclusion position such children as both 'at risk' and a risk to others. They are portrayed as a mixture of deviant delinquent and passive victim. In contrast, this research study found that children have a reflexive awareness of the places they inhabit which recognises the estates as harsh and restricting, yet the same time encompasses more positive feelings of identification and belonging. Most children shared a sense of feeling 'at home,' but one which was infused with both a recognition of the stigma associated with 'sink' estates and a fascinated horror with regard to the behaviour of a delinquent minority.
LanguageEnglish
Pages410-428
Number of pages19
JournalAntipode
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatusPublished - 2000

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municipal council
social exclusion
exclusion
minority
inner city
discourse
experience

Cite this

'I don't really like it here but I don't want to be anywhere else': children and inner city council estates. / Reay, Diane; Lucey, Helen.

In: Antipode, Vol. 32, No. 4, 2000, p. 410-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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