How effective is creativity? Emotive content in TV advertising does not increase attention

Robert G. Heath, Agnes C. Nairn, Paul A. Bottomley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Emotive creativity is generally believed to facilitate communication by increasing attention. However, during relaxed TV viewing, psychology suggests we may pay less not more attention to emotive ads. An experiment conducted in a realistic viewing environment found that ads that were high in emotive content correlated with a 20 percent lower level of attention and that attention toward these ads was unlikely to decline on repeat viewing. This supports the idea that TV advertising is not systematically processed but is automatically processed in response to the stimuli presented. We speculate that emotive creativity may benefit brand TV advertising by lowering attention and inhibiting counter-argument.
LanguageEnglish
Pages450-463
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Advertising Research
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatusPublished - Dec 2009

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How effective is creativity? Emotive content in TV advertising does not increase attention. / Heath, Robert G.; Nairn, Agnes C.; Bottomley, Paul A.

In: Journal of Advertising Research, Vol. 49, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 450-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heath, Robert G. ; Nairn, Agnes C. ; Bottomley, Paul A./ How effective is creativity? Emotive content in TV advertising does not increase attention. In: Journal of Advertising Research. 2009 ; Vol. 49, No. 4. pp. 450-463
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