How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans? A systematic review

Abigail M. Freeman, Katherine Petrilli, Rachel Lees, Chandni Hindocha, Claire Mokrysz, H. Valerie Curran, Rob Saunders, Tom P. Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent liberalisation of cannabis regulation has increased public and scientific debate about its potential benefits and risks. A key focus has been the extent to which cannabidiol (CBD) might influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but this has never been reviewed systematically. In this systematic review of how CBD influences the acute effects of THC we identified 16 studies involving 466 participants. Ten studies were judged at low risk of bias. The findings were mixed, although CBD was found to reduce the effects of THC in several studies. Some studies found that CBD reduced intense experiences of anxiety or psychosis-like effects of THC and blunted some of the impairments on emotion and reward processing. However, CBD did not consistently influence the effects of THC across all studies and outcomes. There was considerable heterogeneity in dose, route of administration and THC:CBD ratio across studies and no clear dose-response profile emerged. Although findings were mixed, this review suggests that CBD may interact with some acute effects of THC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)696-712
Number of pages17
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume107
Early online date30 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans? A systematic review. / Freeman, Abigail M.; Petrilli, Katherine; Lees, Rachel; Hindocha, Chandni; Mokrysz, Claire; Curran, H. Valerie; Saunders, Rob; Freeman, Tom P.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 107, 01.12.2019, p. 696-712.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Freeman, Abigail M. ; Petrilli, Katherine ; Lees, Rachel ; Hindocha, Chandni ; Mokrysz, Claire ; Curran, H. Valerie ; Saunders, Rob ; Freeman, Tom P. / How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans? A systematic review. In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 2019 ; Vol. 107. pp. 696-712.
@article{05750663e99a401aa024226d7d164077,
title = "How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans? A systematic review",
abstract = "The recent liberalisation of cannabis regulation has increased public and scientific debate about its potential benefits and risks. A key focus has been the extent to which cannabidiol (CBD) might influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but this has never been reviewed systematically. In this systematic review of how CBD influences the acute effects of THC we identified 16 studies involving 466 participants. Ten studies were judged at low risk of bias. The findings were mixed, although CBD was found to reduce the effects of THC in several studies. Some studies found that CBD reduced intense experiences of anxiety or psychosis-like effects of THC and blunted some of the impairments on emotion and reward processing. However, CBD did not consistently influence the effects of THC across all studies and outcomes. There was considerable heterogeneity in dose, route of administration and THC:CBD ratio across studies and no clear dose-response profile emerged. Although findings were mixed, this review suggests that CBD may interact with some acute effects of THC.",
author = "Freeman, {Abigail M.} and Katherine Petrilli and Rachel Lees and Chandni Hindocha and Claire Mokrysz and Curran, {H. Valerie} and Rob Saunders and Freeman, {Tom P.}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.09.036",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "696--712",
journal = "Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews",
issn = "0149-7634",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How does cannabidiol (CBD) influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans? A systematic review

AU - Freeman, Abigail M.

AU - Petrilli, Katherine

AU - Lees, Rachel

AU - Hindocha, Chandni

AU - Mokrysz, Claire

AU - Curran, H. Valerie

AU - Saunders, Rob

AU - Freeman, Tom P.

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - The recent liberalisation of cannabis regulation has increased public and scientific debate about its potential benefits and risks. A key focus has been the extent to which cannabidiol (CBD) might influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but this has never been reviewed systematically. In this systematic review of how CBD influences the acute effects of THC we identified 16 studies involving 466 participants. Ten studies were judged at low risk of bias. The findings were mixed, although CBD was found to reduce the effects of THC in several studies. Some studies found that CBD reduced intense experiences of anxiety or psychosis-like effects of THC and blunted some of the impairments on emotion and reward processing. However, CBD did not consistently influence the effects of THC across all studies and outcomes. There was considerable heterogeneity in dose, route of administration and THC:CBD ratio across studies and no clear dose-response profile emerged. Although findings were mixed, this review suggests that CBD may interact with some acute effects of THC.

AB - The recent liberalisation of cannabis regulation has increased public and scientific debate about its potential benefits and risks. A key focus has been the extent to which cannabidiol (CBD) might influence the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but this has never been reviewed systematically. In this systematic review of how CBD influences the acute effects of THC we identified 16 studies involving 466 participants. Ten studies were judged at low risk of bias. The findings were mixed, although CBD was found to reduce the effects of THC in several studies. Some studies found that CBD reduced intense experiences of anxiety or psychosis-like effects of THC and blunted some of the impairments on emotion and reward processing. However, CBD did not consistently influence the effects of THC across all studies and outcomes. There was considerable heterogeneity in dose, route of administration and THC:CBD ratio across studies and no clear dose-response profile emerged. Although findings were mixed, this review suggests that CBD may interact with some acute effects of THC.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073446068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.09.036

DO - 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.09.036

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31580839

AN - SCOPUS:85073446068

VL - 107

SP - 696

EP - 712

JO - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

JF - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

SN - 0149-7634

ER -