Higher education in the United Arab Emirates: an analysis of the outcomes of significant increases in supply and competition

Stephen Wilkins

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Abstract

During the last decade, several countries across the Middle and Far East have established higher education hubs, some of which have grown rapidly by attracting foreign universities to set up international branch campuses. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is by far the largest host of international branch campuses globally, having over 40 providers at the end of 2009. The UAE higher education market has become highly competitive and, in the private sector, supply currently exceeds demand. This paper explores and analyses the outcomes and impacts of this market situation on student recruitment, the student experience, quality and institutional strategies. The long-term viability of international branch campuses in the UAE is also considered, in the context of local political and social issues.
LanguageEnglish
Pages389-400
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Higher Education Policy and Management
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatusPublished - 2010

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United Arab Emirates
supply
education
Far East
market
social issue
Middle East
private sector
student
university
demand
experience

Cite this

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