Growing Our Future The impact of growing food in schools as part of a broader food education programme

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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Abstract

Until now, the positive impact of food growing on learning and
participation has only been seen through observation and anecdote.
This report highlights important evidence about the diverse range of
benefits that food growing in schools offers and the worthwhile role
growing activities play in a child’s educational experience.
Introduction to the report
This report presents the findings of an evaluation conducted by
the University of Bath’s Centre for Research in Education and the
Environment on the impact of growing food in schools as part of a
broader food education programme.
The evaluation used a case study method, drawing on documentary
analysis, school visits, e-consultations, telephone interviews and focus
groups with pupils, teachers, parents and other stakeholders of a diverse
selection of nine flagship Food for Life Partnership (FFLP) schools across
England: five primary, three secondary and one special school.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationCoventry, U. K.
PublisherGarden Organic
Commissioning bodyGarden Organic
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Cite this

Growing Our Future The impact of growing food in schools as part of a broader food education programme. / Barratt Hacking, Elisabeth; Scott, William; Lee, Elsa.

Coventry, U. K. : Garden Organic, 2012. 7 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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