'Greening the Green' - Community Water in the Age of Localism

Nick Gant, Jean Balnave, Kemi Adeyeye

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Recent changes to national planning policies emphasise decentralisation, localism and participatory agendas in a bid to prioritise the 'voice' of local communities in their own governance and development. Core principles of the new National Planning Policy Framework take into account and support local strategies to improve health, social and cultural wellbeing for all, and deliver sufficient community and cultural facilities and services to meet local needs. The framework specifically states that the planning system should play an active role in guiding development to sustainable solutions. However, there are no explicit provisions for the management of water resources. The integration of water considerations into the processes of neighbourhood planning at community, district and regional level will ensure that water efficiency is 'owned' and championed by communities. This chapter explores water efficiency issues at the community scale, primarily along resource resilience themes. By highlighting water as a fundamental issue and concern for the community and its governance, it subsequently discusses where the important considerations for water are situated under 'localism' objectives; as a 'bottom-up', community action process. It concludes that water needs to be considered as an embedded and central part of any community's 'neighbourhood plan' and part of any statutory process to achieve a sustainable community development. This study was commissioned by the Water Efficiency in Buildings Network, funded by DEFRA, UK.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWater Efficiency in Buildings
Subtitle of host publicationTheory and Practice
EditorsK. Adeyeye
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages273-285
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781118456613
ISBN (Print)9781118456576
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Water
Planning
Water resources
Health

Keywords

  • Community empowerment
  • Neighbourhood plan
  • Resilience
  • Water and carbon footprint
  • Water policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Gant, N., Balnave, J., & Adeyeye, K. (2014). 'Greening the Green' - Community Water in the Age of Localism. In K. Adeyeye (Ed.), Water Efficiency in Buildings: Theory and Practice (pp. 273-285). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118456613.ch17

'Greening the Green' - Community Water in the Age of Localism. / Gant, Nick; Balnave, Jean; Adeyeye, Kemi.

Water Efficiency in Buildings: Theory and Practice. ed. / K. Adeyeye. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. p. 273-285.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gant, N, Balnave, J & Adeyeye, K 2014, 'Greening the Green' - Community Water in the Age of Localism. in K Adeyeye (ed.), Water Efficiency in Buildings: Theory and Practice. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 273-285. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118456613.ch17
Gant N, Balnave J, Adeyeye K. 'Greening the Green' - Community Water in the Age of Localism. In Adeyeye K, editor, Water Efficiency in Buildings: Theory and Practice. Wiley-Blackwell. 2014. p. 273-285 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118456613.ch17
Gant, Nick ; Balnave, Jean ; Adeyeye, Kemi. / 'Greening the Green' - Community Water in the Age of Localism. Water Efficiency in Buildings: Theory and Practice. editor / K. Adeyeye. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. pp. 273-285
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