Grave matters: Collectivity and agency as emergent effects in remembering and reconciliation

Kyoko Murakami, D Middleton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine British war veterans' involvement in practices of remembering and reconciliation. These veterans were prisoners of war (POWs) in the Far East in World War II, building the Thai–Burma Railway before transfer to a copper mine in Japan. Some 50 years later, they participated in a "reconciliation visit" to Japan. We discuss how and in what ways their postwar lives and wartime experiences are gathered up in the processes of remembering and reconciliation. In particular, we focus on how memories are transformed through processes of circulating reference in networks associating people, places, and things. We then examine how accounts of redemption involving claims to the consequences of experience as being other than expected, create the basis for emergent forms of remembering and reconciliation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-296
Number of pages24
JournalEthos
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

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reconciliation
Japan
prisoner of war
Far East
Myanmar
World War II
German Federal Railways
experience
Collectivity
Remembering
Reconciliation

Cite this

Grave matters: Collectivity and agency as emergent effects in remembering and reconciliation. / Murakami, Kyoko; Middleton, D.

In: Ethos, Vol. 34, No. 2, 06.2006, p. 273-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murakami, Kyoko ; Middleton, D. / Grave matters: Collectivity and agency as emergent effects in remembering and reconciliation. In: Ethos. 2006 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 273-296.
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