Globalisation and the evolution of international retailing: a comment on Alexander's 'British overseas retailing, 1900-1960'

Andrew Godley, Haiming Hang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 10 Citations

Abstract

Nicholas Alexander's (2011. British overseas retailing, 1900–60: International firm characteristics, market selections and entry modes. Business History, 53, 530–556) survey of British overseas retailers from 1900 to 1960 provides pathbreaking new evidence of international retailing activity during the first globalisation boom. The article surveys this and other recent evidence, and confirms that international retailing was far more significant up to 1929 than previously thought. This activity was overwhelmingly undertaken by non-retailers, however, and hence by multinationals whose advantages in retailing were fundamentally unsustainable over the long run. Even the department store format, the principal retail innovation of the period, was not internationalised primarily by multinationals. Rather it was diffused via indigenous entrepreneurs, driven by a rapidly growing global demand for western style fashion and dress.
LanguageEnglish
Pages529-541
JournalBusiness History
Volume54
Issue number4
Early online date19 Apr 2012
DOIs
StatusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Globalization
Multinationals
Retailing
International retailing
Retailers
Retail
Market selection
Firm characteristics
Market entry
Entrepreneurs
Department stores
Innovation
Entry mode
Store format
Business history
Business History
Boom
Department Stores

Cite this

Globalisation and the evolution of international retailing : a comment on Alexander's 'British overseas retailing, 1900-1960'. / Godley, Andrew; Hang, Haiming.

In: Business History, Vol. 54, No. 4, 2012, p. 529-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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