Geographic range did not confer resilience to extinction in terrestrial vertebrates at the end-Triassic crisis

Alex Dunhill, Matthew Wills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Rates of extinction vary greatly through geological time, with losses particularly concentrated in mass extinctions. Species duration at other times varies greatly, but the reasons for this are unclear. Geographical range correlates with lineage duration amongst marine invertebrates, but it is less clear how far this generality extends to other groups in other habitats. It is also unclear whether a wide geographical distribution makes groups more likely to survive mass extinctions. Here, we test for extinction selectivity amongst terrestrial vertebrates across the end-Triassic event. We demonstrate that terrestrial vertebrate clades with larger geographical ranges were more resilient to extinction than those with smaller ranges throughout the Triassic and Jurassic. However, this relationship weakened with increasing proximity to the end-Triassic mass extinction, breaking down altogether across the event itself. We demonstrate that these findings are not a function of sampling biases; a perennial issue in studies of this kind
Original languageEnglish
Article number7980
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalNature Communications
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Aug 2015

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Biological Extinction
Geographical distribution
resilience
vertebrates
Vertebrates
extinction
Sampling
Selection Bias
Invertebrates
Ecosystem
invertebrates
habitats
proximity
selectivity
sampling

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Geographic range did not confer resilience to extinction in terrestrial vertebrates at the end-Triassic crisis. / Dunhill, Alex; Wills, Matthew.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 6, 7980, 11.08.2015, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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