General practice. All stressed up and nowhere to go?

M. Calnan, D. Wainwright, M. Forsythe, B. Wall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey of 1,545 staff in general practices in South East region found that GPs and practice managers were the most stressed. GPs believed that dealing with difficult patients was particularly stressful. The relationships between the senior partner and practice manager and the GP-nurse relationship were seen as crucial. The relationship between GPs and nurses is characterised by ambivalence and uncertainty. The division of labour between GPs and practice managers needs clarification if the government's proposals for improving general practice are to succeed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-29
Number of pages2
JournalThe Health service journal
Volume110
Issue number5709
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Calnan, M., Wainwright, D., Forsythe, M., & Wall, B. (2000). General practice. All stressed up and nowhere to go? The Health service journal, 110(5709), 28-29.

General practice. All stressed up and nowhere to go? / Calnan, M.; Wainwright, D.; Forsythe, M.; Wall, B.

In: The Health service journal, Vol. 110, No. 5709, 15.06.2000, p. 28-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Calnan, M, Wainwright, D, Forsythe, M & Wall, B 2000, 'General practice. All stressed up and nowhere to go?', The Health service journal, vol. 110, no. 5709, pp. 28-29.
Calnan, M. ; Wainwright, D. ; Forsythe, M. ; Wall, B. / General practice. All stressed up and nowhere to go?. In: The Health service journal. 2000 ; Vol. 110, No. 5709. pp. 28-29.
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