Gender norms in financial markets: Evidence from Kenya

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Abstract

The role of institutions-rules and norms-in markets is increasingly recognized in development discourse. This paper considers the role of gender relations for rules and norms in financial markets. Using evidence from Central Kenya it develops a framework for establishing the influence of gender on the demand for and access to financial services, so explaining the gender differentiated use of rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs). It, first, analyzes intrahousehold norms related to income and expenditure flows and their management, so identifying gendered patterns of demand. Second, by conceptualizing financial intermediaries as operating within rules and norms, it allows the influence of gender relations on access to financial services to be more systematically investigated. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1355-1374
Number of pages20
JournalWorld Development
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

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financial market
financial service
gender relations
Kenya
gender
financial services
demand
evidence
savings
rotating savings and credit association
credit
expenditures
development discourse
income
discourse
market
management
expenditure
norm
Financial markets

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Gender norms in financial markets: Evidence from Kenya. / Johnson, S.

In: World Development, Vol. 32, No. 8, 08.2004, p. 1355-1374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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