Gender equality and employment regulation in the New Labour years (1997-2010): The problem of the gender pay gap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There has been little agreement about how to describe the forms of
employment regulation adopted by New Labour governments from 1997
to 2010. It is often assumed that policy relating to women and employment
falls under the broad heading of ‘partnership’ or ‘voluntary pluralism’. This
rests on the view that female workers’ interests were articulated by trade
unions and brought into the sphere of policy formulation through a process
of dialogue via labour market organizations representing employers and
employees; it also refers to the influence of European Union’s ‘social
partnership’. The article instead views employment regulation during the
New Labour years as hybridized, and subject to party management of unions.
It argues that Labour could have done more to ‘call organised business’s
bluff’ to strengthen work–family measures or equal-pay legislation. Its
reluctance to do so led to missed opportunities for progressive social
change, despite gains made by women within the Labour leadership circle
and trade-unionists at key junctures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-120
Number of pages38
JournalHistorical Studies in Industrial Relations
Volume43
Publication statusAcceptance date - 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gender equality and employment regulation in the New Labour years (1997-2010): The problem of the gender pay gap'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this