Gamma-ray bursts in the era of rapid followup

C. G. Mundell, C. Guidorzi, I. A. Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a status report on the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the era of rapid followup using the world's largest robotic optical telescopesthe 2m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes. Within the context of key unsolved issues in GRB physics, we describe (1) our innovative software that allows real-time automatic analysis and interpretation of GRB light curves, (2) the novel instrumentation that allows unique types of observations (in particular, early time polarisation measurements), and (3) the key science questions and discoveries to which robotic observations are ideally suited, concluding with a summary of current understanding of GRB physics provided by combining rapid optical observations with simultaneous observations at other wavelengths.

Original languageEnglish
Article number718468
Number of pages14
JournalAdvances in Astronomy
Volume2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Nov 2010

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robotics
gamma ray bursts
physics
instrumentation
polarization
wavelength
software
light curve
telescopes
computer programs
wavelengths
analysis
science
world

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Gamma-ray bursts in the era of rapid followup. / Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Steele, I. A.

In: Advances in Astronomy, Vol. 2010, 718468, 22.11.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mundell, C. G. ; Guidorzi, C. ; Steele, I. A. / Gamma-ray bursts in the era of rapid followup. In: Advances in Astronomy. 2010 ; Vol. 2010.
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