Abstract

The increasing penetration of intermittent, low carbon generation poses a major threat to transmission system frequency stability. To mitigate this issue, future system frequency response can be provided by not only the generation side, such as from large, synchronous generators, but also by the customer side, such as from flexible technologies. This paper develops a novel model to evaluate the contribution from domestic Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants to system frequency in the GB power system. This is achieved by controlling the electricity production from CHPs in response to significant fluctuations in system frequency. The results show that domestic CHP could increase system frequency stability with minimal adverse impact on the customers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2302-2309
Number of pages8
JournalEnergy Procedia
Volume105
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Frequency stability
System stability
Frequency response
Cogeneration plants
Synchronous generators
Electricity
Carbon
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • CHP
  • demand side response
  • frequency response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Frequency Response in the GB Power System from Responsive CHPs. / Bian, Yuankai; Wang, Hantao; Wyman-Pain, Heather; Gu, Chenghong; Li, Furong.

In: Energy Procedia, Vol. 105, 01.06.2017, p. 2302-2309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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