Fractures in the education-economy relationship

The end of the skill bias technological change research programme?

Hugh Lauder, Phillip Brown, Sin Yi Cheung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper undertakes a critical theoretical and empirical analysis of the traditional approach to analysing the education-economy relationship: skill bias technological change theory. It argues that while leading skill bias theorists have sought to address some of the anomalies that the theory confronts, there remain key data patterns that the theory cannot address. We suggest an alternative account that takes a broader political economy perspective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-515
Number of pages21
JournalOxford Review of Economic Policy
Volume34
Issue number3
Early online date2 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

research program
education
political economy
empirical analysis
labor market
income
anomaly
economy
Education
Research program
Skill bias
Political economy

Keywords

  • Education-economy
  • Global labour markets
  • Political economy
  • Skill bias theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Fractures in the education-economy relationship : The end of the skill bias technological change research programme? / Lauder, Hugh; Brown, Phillip; Cheung, Sin Yi.

In: Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2018, p. 495-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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