Fostering Hope: The importance of undertaking research with children and young people

Justin Rogers

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Over the past twenty years there has been increasing interest in research that focuses on the experiences of children and young people. However, it has been argued that in research about foster care the involvement of children and young people is more limited. Their participation and representation in research studies is growing but this has often been as a small part of wider studies that focus on the views of carers and social workers. There has also been criticism that foster care studies often focus on outcomes and how this can lead to research that promotes negative portrayals of those in care, which can serve to stigmatise them and fail to recognise their resilience, strengths, hopes and ambitions.
This presentation will share the lessons I have learnt undertaking research directly with young people in foster care. It will draw on the fostering hope project that promoted the involvement of separated refugee children, living in foster care, at the centre of the project. I will outline how important it is for researchers to consider research designs that promote participation and ensure projects are fun, empowering and meaningful. I will set out ways to involve young people but also highlight some of the challenges to meaningful participation.
This presentation will show the value of involving children and young people in research and will argue the only way to understand their experience is to involve them.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 11 Aug 2017
EventVoices in Action: Create Foundation Conference - International Convention Centre, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 10 Aug 201712 Aug 2017
https://voicesinaction.create.org.au/speakers/

Conference

ConferenceVoices in Action
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period10/08/1712/08/17
Internet address

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