Food crisis coverage by social and traditional media: a case study of the 2008 Irish dioxin crisis

Liran Shan, Aine Regan, Aoife De Brun, Julie Barnett, Maarten C. A. van der Sanden, Patrick Wall, Aine McConnon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The world of communication has changed significantly in the last decade as a result of the evolution of social media. Food crisis managers and communicators should be cognizant of the messages presented to the public by all media channels during a crisis. Using the 2008 Irish dioxin contamination incident as an example, a quantitative content analysis was carried out to investigate the relationship between social and traditional media. Messages published in printed newspapers (n = 141), blogs and forums (n = 107), and Twitter (n = 68) were analysed to investigate sourcing practice, story topic and use of tone. Results revealed that traditional media relied on diverse offline sources in reporting a wide range of topics. In comparison, social media responded faster and diminished faster, using offline and online media news messages as the primary sources in reporting very limited topics. No significant difference was found in the presence of negative tone across media.
LanguageEnglish
Pages911-928
Number of pages18
JournalPublic Understanding of Science
Volume23
Issue number8
Early online date1 Feb 2013
DOIs
StatusPublished - Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Social Media
Dioxins
Blogs
Contamination
Managers
coverage
Blogging
food
Food
Newspapers
Communication
social media
online media
communicator
twitter
weblog
environmental pollution
content analysis
incident
newspaper

Cite this

Food crisis coverage by social and traditional media : a case study of the 2008 Irish dioxin crisis. / Shan, Liran; Regan, Aine; De Brun, Aoife; Barnett, Julie; van der Sanden, Maarten C. A.; Wall, Patrick; McConnon, Aine.

In: Public Understanding of Science, Vol. 23, No. 8, 11.2014, p. 911-928.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shan, Liran ; Regan, Aine ; De Brun, Aoife ; Barnett, Julie ; van der Sanden, Maarten C. A. ; Wall, Patrick ; McConnon, Aine. / Food crisis coverage by social and traditional media : a case study of the 2008 Irish dioxin crisis. In: Public Understanding of Science. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 8. pp. 911-928.
@article{3e98d2900fd44b108e5f5756e1731381,
title = "Food crisis coverage by social and traditional media: a case study of the 2008 Irish dioxin crisis",
abstract = "The world of communication has changed significantly in the last decade as a result of the evolution of social media. Food crisis managers and communicators should be cognizant of the messages presented to the public by all media channels during a crisis. Using the 2008 Irish dioxin contamination incident as an example, a quantitative content analysis was carried out to investigate the relationship between social and traditional media. Messages published in printed newspapers (n = 141), blogs and forums (n = 107), and Twitter (n = 68) were analysed to investigate sourcing practice, story topic and use of tone. Results revealed that traditional media relied on diverse offline sources in reporting a wide range of topics. In comparison, social media responded faster and diminished faster, using offline and online media news messages as the primary sources in reporting very limited topics. No significant difference was found in the presence of negative tone across media.",
author = "Liran Shan and Aine Regan and {De Brun}, Aoife and Julie Barnett and {van der Sanden}, {Maarten C. A.} and Patrick Wall and Aine McConnon",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1177/0963662512472315",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "911--928",
journal = "Public Understanding of Science",
issn = "0963-6625",
publisher = "Sage Publications",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Food crisis coverage by social and traditional media

T2 - Public Understanding of Science

AU - Shan, Liran

AU - Regan, Aine

AU - De Brun, Aoife

AU - Barnett, Julie

AU - van der Sanden, Maarten C. A.

AU - Wall, Patrick

AU - McConnon, Aine

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - The world of communication has changed significantly in the last decade as a result of the evolution of social media. Food crisis managers and communicators should be cognizant of the messages presented to the public by all media channels during a crisis. Using the 2008 Irish dioxin contamination incident as an example, a quantitative content analysis was carried out to investigate the relationship between social and traditional media. Messages published in printed newspapers (n = 141), blogs and forums (n = 107), and Twitter (n = 68) were analysed to investigate sourcing practice, story topic and use of tone. Results revealed that traditional media relied on diverse offline sources in reporting a wide range of topics. In comparison, social media responded faster and diminished faster, using offline and online media news messages as the primary sources in reporting very limited topics. No significant difference was found in the presence of negative tone across media.

AB - The world of communication has changed significantly in the last decade as a result of the evolution of social media. Food crisis managers and communicators should be cognizant of the messages presented to the public by all media channels during a crisis. Using the 2008 Irish dioxin contamination incident as an example, a quantitative content analysis was carried out to investigate the relationship between social and traditional media. Messages published in printed newspapers (n = 141), blogs and forums (n = 107), and Twitter (n = 68) were analysed to investigate sourcing practice, story topic and use of tone. Results revealed that traditional media relied on diverse offline sources in reporting a wide range of topics. In comparison, social media responded faster and diminished faster, using offline and online media news messages as the primary sources in reporting very limited topics. No significant difference was found in the presence of negative tone across media.

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963662512472315

U2 - 10.1177/0963662512472315

DO - 10.1177/0963662512472315

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 911

EP - 928

JO - Public Understanding of Science

JF - Public Understanding of Science

SN - 0963-6625

IS - 8

ER -