Flexion following hip resurfacing and factors that influence it

G. Grammatopoulos, A. Philpott, K. Reilly, H. Pandit, K. Barker, D. W. Murray, H. S. Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Flexion following arthroplasty of the hip is important for activities of daily living. Studies have highlighted a possible reduction in flexion following Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty (MoMHRA) but failed to account for inter-subject variability and the possible etiology for this reduction. This in vivo study aims to determine whether flexion is restored following MoMHRA and identify factors that influence it. Charnley Class A patients (n=112) that underwent MoMHRA were reviewed in a dedicated clinic assessing flexion (resurfaced and contra-lateral hips) and outcome. The difference in flexion between both hips was defined as flexion deficit (deltaflexion). Various patient (age, gender, BMI) and surgical (component orientation, size, head-neck-ratio, offset) factors were examined in terms of their effect on deltaflexion. MoMHRA-hips had significantly reduced flexion as compared to the native hips. This flexion-deficit correlated with contra-lateral maximum flexion, component size, head-neck-ratio and component orientation. The findings demonstrate that flexion following MoMHRA is strongly correlated to but is reduced in comparison to the native, disease-free, hip flexion. Surgical practice can minimise flexion-deficit and optimise function.
LanguageEnglish
Pages266-273
JournalHip International
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatusPublished - 2012

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Hip
Metals
Arthroplasty
Neck
Head
Activities of Daily Living

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Grammatopoulos, G., Philpott, A., Reilly, K., Pandit, H., Barker, K., Murray, D. W., & Gill, H. S. (2012). Flexion following hip resurfacing and factors that influence it. Hip International, 22(3), 266-273. DOI: 10.5301/HIP.2012.9280

Flexion following hip resurfacing and factors that influence it. / Grammatopoulos, G.; Philpott, A.; Reilly, K.; Pandit, H.; Barker, K.; Murray, D. W.; Gill, H. S.

In: Hip International, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2012, p. 266-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grammatopoulos, G, Philpott, A, Reilly, K, Pandit, H, Barker, K, Murray, DW & Gill, HS 2012, 'Flexion following hip resurfacing and factors that influence it' Hip International, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 266-273. DOI: 10.5301/HIP.2012.9280
Grammatopoulos G, Philpott A, Reilly K, Pandit H, Barker K, Murray DW et al. Flexion following hip resurfacing and factors that influence it. Hip International. 2012;22(3):266-273. Available from, DOI: 10.5301/HIP.2012.9280
Grammatopoulos, G. ; Philpott, A. ; Reilly, K. ; Pandit, H. ; Barker, K. ; Murray, D. W. ; Gill, H. S./ Flexion following hip resurfacing and factors that influence it. In: Hip International. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 266-273
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