Flexible formwork technologies: a state of the art review

William Hawkins, John Orr, Timothy Ibell, Paul Shepherd, Herrmann Michael, Benjamin` Kromoser, Alexander Michaelski, Remo Pedreschi, H. R. Schipper, D. Veenendaal, Rene Wansdronk, Mark West, A. Pronk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)
112 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Concrete is our most widely used construction material. Worldwide consumption of cement, the strength-giving component of concrete, is estimated at 4.10 Gt per year, rising from 2.22 Gt just ten years ago [1]. This rate of consumption means that cement manufacture alone is estimated to account for 5.2 % of global carbon dioxide emissions [2].
Concrete offers the opportunity to economically create structures of almost any geometry. Yet its unique fluidity is seldom capitalised upon, with concrete instead being cast into rigid, flat moulds to create unoptimised geometries that result in high material use structures with large carbon footprints. This paper will explore flexible formwork construction technologies which embrace the fluidity of concrete to facilitate the practical construction of concrete structures with complex and efficient geometries.
This paper presents the current state of the art in flexible formwork technology, highlighting practical uses, research challenges and new opportunities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)911-935
JournalStructural Concrete
Volume17
Issue number6
Early online date7 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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Concretes
Fluidity
Geometry
Cement manufacture
Carbon footprint
Concrete construction
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon dioxide
Cements

Keywords

  • Fabric formwork
  • flexible formwork
  • disruptive innovation
  • optimisation
  • Construction

Cite this

Flexible formwork technologies: a state of the art review. / Hawkins, William; Orr, John; Ibell, Timothy; Shepherd, Paul; Michael, Herrmann; Kromoser, Benjamin`; Michaelski, Alexander; Pedreschi, Remo; Schipper, H. R.; Veenendaal, D.; Wansdronk, Rene; West, Mark; Pronk, A.

In: Structural Concrete , Vol. 17, No. 6, 12.2016, p. 911-935.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hawkins, W, Orr, J, Ibell, T, Shepherd, P, Michael, H, Kromoser, B, Michaelski, A, Pedreschi, R, Schipper, HR, Veenendaal, D, Wansdronk, R, West, M & Pronk, A 2016, 'Flexible formwork technologies: a state of the art review', Structural Concrete , vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 911-935. https://doi.org/10.1002/suco.201600117
Hawkins, William ; Orr, John ; Ibell, Timothy ; Shepherd, Paul ; Michael, Herrmann ; Kromoser, Benjamin` ; Michaelski, Alexander ; Pedreschi, Remo ; Schipper, H. R. ; Veenendaal, D. ; Wansdronk, Rene ; West, Mark ; Pronk, A. / Flexible formwork technologies: a state of the art review. In: Structural Concrete . 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 911-935.
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