Finite element prediction of endosteal and periosteal bone remodelling in the turkey ulna: effect of remodelling signal and dead-zone definition

W R Taylor, M D Warner, S E Clift

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bone remodelling is the adaptation of bone mass in response to localized changes in loading conditions. The nature of the mechanical signal governing remodelling, however, remains the subject of continued investigation. The aims of this study were to use an iterative finite element (FE) bone remodelling technique to explore the effect of different remodelling signals in the prediction of bone remodelling behaviour. A finite element model of the turkey ulna, following that of Brown et al., was analysed using the ABAQUS package. The model was validated against the static predictions of the Brown et al. study. A bone remodelling technique, based on swelling algorithms given by Taylor and Clift, was then applied to predict the dramatic change in loading conditions imposed. The resulting changes in FE mid-shaft bone geometry were compared with the remodelling observed experimentally and showed good agreement. The tensile principal stress was found to be the best remodelling signal under the imposed conditions. Localized sensitivities in the remodelling patterns were found, however, and the definition of the dead zone was modified as a result. Remodelling with the new dead-zone definition showed that both the tensile principal stress and the tensile principal strain produced the remodelling patterns that agreed most closely with experiment
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H - Journal of Engineering in Medicine
Volume217
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Bone
ABAQUS
Swelling
Geometry
Experiments

Cite this

@article{5717fac3566f457da3a205637f2423a7,
title = "Finite element prediction of endosteal and periosteal bone remodelling in the turkey ulna: effect of remodelling signal and dead-zone definition",
abstract = "Bone remodelling is the adaptation of bone mass in response to localized changes in loading conditions. The nature of the mechanical signal governing remodelling, however, remains the subject of continued investigation. The aims of this study were to use an iterative finite element (FE) bone remodelling technique to explore the effect of different remodelling signals in the prediction of bone remodelling behaviour. A finite element model of the turkey ulna, following that of Brown et al., was analysed using the ABAQUS package. The model was validated against the static predictions of the Brown et al. study. A bone remodelling technique, based on swelling algorithms given by Taylor and Clift, was then applied to predict the dramatic change in loading conditions imposed. The resulting changes in FE mid-shaft bone geometry were compared with the remodelling observed experimentally and showed good agreement. The tensile principal stress was found to be the best remodelling signal under the imposed conditions. Localized sensitivities in the remodelling patterns were found, however, and the definition of the dead zone was modified as a result. Remodelling with the new dead-zone definition showed that both the tensile principal stress and the tensile principal strain produced the remodelling patterns that agreed most closely with experiment",
author = "Taylor, {W R} and Warner, {M D} and Clift, {S E}",
year = "2003",
language = "English",
volume = "217",
pages = "349--356",
journal = "Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine",
issn = "0954-4119",
publisher = "Sage Publications",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Finite element prediction of endosteal and periosteal bone remodelling in the turkey ulna: effect of remodelling signal and dead-zone definition

AU - Taylor, W R

AU - Warner, M D

AU - Clift, S E

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Bone remodelling is the adaptation of bone mass in response to localized changes in loading conditions. The nature of the mechanical signal governing remodelling, however, remains the subject of continued investigation. The aims of this study were to use an iterative finite element (FE) bone remodelling technique to explore the effect of different remodelling signals in the prediction of bone remodelling behaviour. A finite element model of the turkey ulna, following that of Brown et al., was analysed using the ABAQUS package. The model was validated against the static predictions of the Brown et al. study. A bone remodelling technique, based on swelling algorithms given by Taylor and Clift, was then applied to predict the dramatic change in loading conditions imposed. The resulting changes in FE mid-shaft bone geometry were compared with the remodelling observed experimentally and showed good agreement. The tensile principal stress was found to be the best remodelling signal under the imposed conditions. Localized sensitivities in the remodelling patterns were found, however, and the definition of the dead zone was modified as a result. Remodelling with the new dead-zone definition showed that both the tensile principal stress and the tensile principal strain produced the remodelling patterns that agreed most closely with experiment

AB - Bone remodelling is the adaptation of bone mass in response to localized changes in loading conditions. The nature of the mechanical signal governing remodelling, however, remains the subject of continued investigation. The aims of this study were to use an iterative finite element (FE) bone remodelling technique to explore the effect of different remodelling signals in the prediction of bone remodelling behaviour. A finite element model of the turkey ulna, following that of Brown et al., was analysed using the ABAQUS package. The model was validated against the static predictions of the Brown et al. study. A bone remodelling technique, based on swelling algorithms given by Taylor and Clift, was then applied to predict the dramatic change in loading conditions imposed. The resulting changes in FE mid-shaft bone geometry were compared with the remodelling observed experimentally and showed good agreement. The tensile principal stress was found to be the best remodelling signal under the imposed conditions. Localized sensitivities in the remodelling patterns were found, however, and the definition of the dead zone was modified as a result. Remodelling with the new dead-zone definition showed that both the tensile principal stress and the tensile principal strain produced the remodelling patterns that agreed most closely with experiment

M3 - Article

VL - 217

SP - 349

EP - 356

JO - Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine

JF - Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine

SN - 0954-4119

IS - 5

ER -