Fibre-selective discrimination of physiological ENG using velocity selective recording: Report on pilot rat experiments

Benjamin Metcalfe, Daniel Chew, Christopher Clarke, Nick Donaldson, John Taylor

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

5 Citations (Scopus)
151 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper presents results from a pilot experiment in which the technique of velocity selective recording (VSR) was used to identify naturally occurring electroneurogram (ENG) signals within the intact nerve of a rat. Signals were acquired using a set of electrodes placed along the length of the nerve, formed from simple wire hooks. This basic form of recording has already been applied in-vivo to the analysis of electrically excited compound action potentials (CAPs) in both pig and frog, however, this method has never before been used to identify naturally occurring neural signals. Results in this paper highlight challenges which must be overcome in order for the transition to be made from electrically evoked potentials to naturally occurring signals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages2645-2648
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2014
Event2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC) - Chicago, IL, USA, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 26 Aug 201430 Aug 2014

Conference

Conference2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityChicago, IL, USA
Period26/08/1430/08/14

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    Metcalfe, B., Chew, D., Clarke, C., Donaldson, N., & Taylor, J. (2014). Fibre-selective discrimination of physiological ENG using velocity selective recording: Report on pilot rat experiments. 2645-2648. 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), Chicago, IL, USA, UK United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6944166