Family motivation of supervisors: Exploring the impact on subordinates’ work performance via family supportive supervisor behaviors and work–family balance satisfaction

Didem Taser Erdogan, Mireia Las Heras, Yasin Rofcanin, Maria Jose Bosch, Jakob Stollberber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) have emerged as a powerful resource of informal support for the well-being and development of employees. However, research to date offers limited insight into the antecedents and underlying processes that may trigger FSSBs. We investigate the association between family motivation of supervisors and FSSBs, and how the latter mediates the association between supervisors’ family motivation and subordinates’ work performance. Furthermore, we examine the role of supervisors’ satisfaction with their work–family balance as a contextual variable influencing our proposed associations. We draw on FSSB and perspective taking theory as over-arching frameworks for our hypotheses. Using matched and multisource supervisor-subordinate data collected from an organization in Chile (196 subordinates and 75 supervisors), our findings revealed that FSSBs are mechanisms linking supervisors’ family motivation to subordinates’ work performance. Interestingly, this positive association is moderated by supervisors’ satisfaction with their work–family balance, such that the mediation of FSSBs is stronger for supervisors who are not satisfied with their work–family balance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1179-1195
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume52
Issue number12
Early online date16 Aug 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

No funders were acknowledged.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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